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Political Strategy Notes

Craig Timberg and Amy Gardner have an encouraging read, "Democrats push to redeploy Obama's voter database" at the Washington Post. As Michael Slaby, the Obama campaign's 'chief integration and innovation officer,' put it: "Though often described as "microtargeting," Slaby said the most important element was what he called "micro-listening." I have a hunch Republicans are going to have trouble replicating the Dem's edge in microtargeting and message testing, since listening well is clearly not a big part of their skill set.

As Messina says "Old-Fashioned Door Knocking Got Better Data Than Online Data Mining," notes Elizabeth Flock of U.S. News.

At The New Yorker, Jeffrey Toobin assesses the prospects for filibuster reform.

Interesting: Peyton M. Craighill and Scott Clement report in their WaPo article "Can unions save the white working-class vote for Democrats?" that "At the national level, just 18 percent of voters are union members themselves or live in a house with a member. That's down six percentage points since 2004 and the lowest level in exit polls back to 1972." I would say that 18 percent is a pretty sizable constituency.

Wow. John McCain's nickname should not be "Old Sour Grapes," as a friend calls him -- It should be "Vinegar," as this revealing report, "The Unhinging of John McCain" by Geoffrey Dunn indicates.

The ratings ass-whupping commeth for Fox news too, courtesy of MSNBC.

This is kind of a knuckleheaded argument, considering that there are more than 6,000 Latino elected officials and more than 45 milion Latinos in the U.S. Also, it wasn't all that long ago, we saw a guy go from being a lowly state senator with little money and few connections to President of the U.S. in about 5 years.

Oh, please.

The Nation's Eric Alterman explains how the Romney campaign's delusions of political grandeur were spoon-fed by the MSM: "Post-truth politics reached a new pinnacle this year as major MSM machers admitted to a lack of concern with the veracity of the news their institutions reported. "It's not our job to litigate [the facts] in the paper," New York Times national editor Sam Sifton told the paper's public editor, Margaret Sullivan, regarding phony Republican "voter fraud" allegations. "We need to state what each side says." "The truth? C'mon, this is a political convention" was the headline over a column by Glenn Kessler, the Washington Post "fact-checker."...not only did many members of the MSM give Romney a pass on his serial lying; they actually endorsed his candidacy on the assumption that we need not take seriously any of those statements the candidate had felt compelled to make in order to win the nomination of his party."

A cartoon for the still-clueless.