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Dead-Eye Dick

If you need a good chuckle today, or just a defense mechanism against the high-pitched chattering whine of conservative spin against health care reform, check out Joe Conason's reality check about the accuracy in recent years of Dick Morris' political predictions:

During the 2008 election cycle, Morris offered many forecasts, none of which were right. Early on he picked Hillary Clinton and Rudolph Giuliani as almost certain nominees of their respective parties and trashed John McCain as a sure loser. In January 2007, he told an audience of conservative journalists: "I think what's going to happen in the world is that Hillary's going to be the next president." Not too long after that, he and wife Eileen McGann wrote a column for the New York Post headlined "It’s Now a Rudy Romp." A year later, he was predicting that Clinton would crash and burn in the New Hampshire primary, right up to the evening before that election. Her tears had proved to voters that she was unfit to serve as president, he explained. When she won the following night, he overreacted again by predicting that she would surely go on to secure the nomination. (Back when Clinton was running for the U.S. Senate from New York in the 2000 cycle, Morris similarly made one delusional prediction after another, claiming that she would never run, withdraw, falter, lose, and so on. She ran and won, of course.)

Among Dick’s wackiest blunders in recent years was his confident assertion -- on the eve of the 2006 midterm election -- that North Korea would become the overriding issue in that campaign, eclipsing taxes, the war in Iraq, and Republican corruption

Since Morris is now probably the shrillest prophet of perpetual doom for Democrats if health reform passes (after, as Conason points out, predicting in the wake of Scott Brown's election that Obama would never have another significant legislative victory), it's worth knowing that the man rarely knows what he's talking about--or if he does, he's supressing that knowledge in the interest of spin.