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'50 State Strategy' Sinks Roots in Red Soil

Kos riffs on US News & World Report's update on the progress of DNC Chair Howard Dean's "50-state strategy" and the conflict with the agendas of DCCC's Rahm Emanuel and DSCC's Chuck Schumer. Explains Kos:

Folks at the DSCC and DCCC have to think short-term. That's their job. That's why we have a DNC -- to work towards building a long-term, healthy, viable national party. That there's friction is perhaps a feature, not a bug of the system...in the long-term, a healthy national Democratic Party will make the jobs of future heads of the DSCC and DCCC much easier.

In the US News article, author Dan Gilgore reports on the DNC's promising progress in Mississippi, and gives fair vent to the DCCC's and DSCC's concern that '06 campaign funding is being damaged by the DNC's long-term focus:

Grousing about insufficient funds from the DNC, Emanuel recently told Roll Call "there is no cavalry financially for us." Emanuel declined interview requests, but DCCC sources say more money should go to Democratic candidates in tight races, not to field organizers in long-shot red states.

The stakes are high indeed, as Gilgore notes:

A big bet. With the future of the Democratic Party at stake, Republicans are watching closely, too. "Dean could wind up looking like a genius eventually," says a top GOP strategist. "Or this could be the election that could have been."

...the 50-State Strategy, for the time being, is focused more on keeping or regaining control of state legislatures, which have taken on more national political value because they draw the lines for U.S. House seats. In Mississippi, Democrats control the Legislature but have lost dozens of seats recently. In Arizona, Republicans are three seats away from veto proof majorities in the state House and Senate. The state Democratic Party there has used its DNC field organizers to do aggressive outreach to American Indians and Hispanics, particularly during the huge immigrant rights protests earlier this year. "The DNC has enabled us to become part of the fabric of these communities," says Arizona party chair David Waid. "There used to be this sense of coming around only when we wanted your vote."

It's a tough call, and the article has a lot more to say about the consequences and choices involved in allocating resources short-term vs. long term.